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Easy Honey Sweet Potatoes

sweet potatoes cooked

We had these with our supper (dinner for many of you) tonight.  They are so so easy and delicious.  We often eat them for dessert.

  1.   Wash and peel a couple of big sweet potatoes.  Cut in slices/chunks as shown.
  2.  Heat an iron skillet over medium heat, add a couple Tablespoonfuls of coconut oil or olive oil.
  3.  Add potaotes and drizzle honey on top.  I may use 1/4 cup honey.  Adjust this amount for the sweetness you like.
  4.  Pour about 1/2 cup water over the honey.
  5. Cover and cook about 15 minutes or until potaotes are soft as you like and liquid is absorbed.

We had these potatoes with meatloaf (which was frozen earlier and baked a short while before starting the remainder of the meal), cornbread, beans (canned ones tonight), and roasted cabbage.  cabbage cooked plate I like the slight burned taste when I cook this cabbage under the broiler.

Roasted Cabbage—-

  1.  Cut 1/2 cabbage head in small pieces.  See photo.  Toss with a couple tablespoonfuls of sesmae oil.  You can also use olive oil, but I think the sesmae oil gives it a nice taste.
  2. Put cabbage in a single layer and put under the broiler.  Broil about 5 minutes.  Turn/toss the cabbage with a spatula and broil about 4 or 5 more minutes.
  3. Watch closely, however, I like a little charring around the edges.dabbage raw in bowl        .cabbage raw on sheet

 

Happiness is overrated

I think happiness depends on happenings (which are constantly changing), whereas joy depends on peace and security in the Lord.

Little Ideas Page

I’m not saying this to be controversial and certainly not to be pessimistic. I just think the world’s gone a bit obsessed over the concept of being happy and what that means.

Today’s well-intentioned advice about how to be happier may actually be making us feel bad when we don’t feel “ecstatic, leaping out of bed in the morning, can’t stop smiling”, happy. If you don’t feel particularly cheerful, does that mean you are failing at life?

No, of course not. Imagine someone who is in the midst of their studies; stressed to the maximum. At that moment, happiness takes second place to hard work and accomplishment.

Happiness may be one great emotion, but it is not the only one that matters. Some other feelings you may come across on your journey that are of EQUAL value;

1. Sense of accomplishment

2. Sense of fulfillment

3. Personal growth

4. Sense…

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Episode 6–A Personal Triumph Over Early Onset Alzheimer’s

I hope many of you got to see some of the 14 episodes that I mentioned in the last post “Awakening from Alzheimer’s” before they went off at 12:00 midnight last night.  All of the episodes were great, but Episode 6 explained why Alzheimer’s is often called type 3 diabetes. They were saying the brain runs on glucose, and in alzheimer’s patients there is an insulin deficiency/insulin resistance in the brain.  Glucose needs insulin to get into cells of the body.  In the brain insulin releases these glucose transporters that help glucose get in the brain.  If you can’t get glucose into brain cells, the cells die.

Excessive sugar in the diet is the problem.  In the eaarly 1800’s a person might have eaten 6 lbs. of sugar a year, but today with the average American diet, we eat over 130 lbs. a year.  If your brain is not processing glucose well, coconut oil and MCT oil will help your brain produce an alternative fuel, ketones.

I could go on and on with the science details that I learned from these webinars because I find them so interesting, but suffice it to say our diets, along with lifestyle changes, are  main criteria in overall health, and now they are finding out especially in neurological disorders. Sad to say, most medical doctors have very little training in nutrition.

 

A MUST SEE–AWAKENING FROM ALZHEIMER’S

As many of you know my husband is having symptoms of Dementia/Alzheimer’s, therefore I have been learning everything I can  on the subject. In the past 12 days I have viewed webinars sponsored by Dr. David Perlmutter, a 30 year practicing neurologist whose father died with Alzheimer’s disease.  These webinars show interviews with 14 specialists in the field and describe the most recent studies and successes. This is so encouraging since there seems to be nothing yet in the pharmaceutical field that can help.

I cannot reccommend these webinars highly enough. They are free and are running again this weekend.  You can access them  by clicking here.

Even if you are not dealing with someone with these problems, it would be wise to learn what you can about the preventative measures you should take.

 

Peanut Chicken

I am not good with titles, so for want of a better one, this dish is peanut chicken. This is another quick throw-together for a busy church night.

I am taking culinary classes online, and the chef has been encouraging us to cook wihtout recipes.  He is teaching methods of cooking and says that cooking is an art not a rigid set of directions. So here goes.

  1. Preheat a large saute pan on medium.  Salt chicken lightly and pepper it generously.  Put about 2 Tablespoons of sesame oil in the pan and saute chicken briefly until it looses its color and is tender.  One could use olive oil, but the sesame oil gives it a different flavor. Chicken breast is not very flavorful on its own.

2.  Remove chicken from pan and add 2 or 3 chopped garlic cloves.  Cook about 1                       minute or until fragrant.

3.  Add some brocolli florets and green peppers and saute a couple of minutes.                          Add some spinach and continue cooking until spinach is wilted, about 2 minutes.                Use whatever veggies you like. I just happened to have spinach that needed to be                used before it went bad.  Add chicken back  to the pan. Cover and set aside while                you prepare the peanuts.

4.    Put a spoonful of coconut oil in a small preheated skillet, add raw peanuts                            (cashews  would work here also) and cook a few minutes until peanuts                                  are slightly brown, stirring constantly.  Salt to taste.

5.  Serve chicken mixture with peanuts on top.  After I made this tonight, I had a                       suggestion that the peanuts be chopped slightly so that it would be easier to scoop             them up with a fork. We thought the peanuts gave the chicken a nicer flavor and I             loved the crunch!

peanut chicken

 

If Knowledge Is a Ten, I Start At Minus Seven When It Comes to Gardening

I’m all about growing fresh vegetables, but here’s a friends take on how difficult that can be for some. Hope you get a laugh out of it.

Margery Warder

Not long after I married, my husband concluded plants rarely survived under my care. He’d tell people not to give me plants. He said plants sitting beside my kitchen sink would die for lack of water. I felt a little better telling him some of them were plastic… But I guess he’s mostly right. A thriving African violet would do fine for months until I moved it to a slightly different location.  Before long, I try to figure out what to do with the dirt in the pot where it had died. I tried growing a few vegetables in our first garden; my husband said my cucumbers were an embarrassment and instructed me to pick them as early as I could because they were “curly” instead of straight. In my defense, I am thankful I can report that a raspberry patch someone started before we moved in was still bearing…

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Toasted Almonds and That’s All

I had almost forgotten how good plain toasted almonds were-no salt, no oil, nothing else.  In fact, I am munching on some and drinking my herb tea as I type this post.  Of course, I like the raw ones also, but there is something special about the taste and crunch of toasted ones.

almondsalmonds 2almonds 3

1,  Preheat oven to 300 degrees.

2.  Spread the almonds out in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet.

3.  Toast until golden brown and aromatic, about 15-20 minutes.

4.  I then store mine in a jar with a tight-fitting lid on the countertop for quick snacking.

I don’t know if you are able to tell clearly or not, but the second picture is after the almonds are toasted.  Also, you can always dip them in melted chocolate and let cool for a sweet treat.

 

Quick church night dinner

quick church night meal This is what I made tonight just before we left for church.  It was quick, simple, yet very tasty.  Please forgive the mini cucumber with a bite out of it.  I didn’t think of posting this until I had started eating.

  1.  Scrub (in soapy water) and rinsed 6 medium red potatoes and cut them in large chunks.
  2.  Cut one pound Italian sausage into chunks.
  3.  Cut up peppers.  I only had green.  Yellow and Red ones would be nice and colorful.                                                                                                                                           INSTRUCTIONS:  Put about 1 Tbsp. oil in a skillet that has a tight-fitting lid.  Heat on medium.  When oil is hot drop in potatoes and sausages.  Put the lid on the pan and cook about 20-25 minutes or until potatoes are soft.  Stir with a stiff spatula a few times during cooking.  This will help you to scrap sticky residue off the bottom of the pan, but there will be some sticking to the bottom. You might be tempted to add more oil or some water, but you don’t need to do this.  Next add peppers and cook about 5 minutes longer.

I served this dish with a mini cucumber and a piece of french bread.

I have found that the easiest way to get stuck on stuff off my cookware is to put a little water in the bottom of the pan, cover,  put it on a hot burner until the water begins to boil, then turn the burner off.  Let it sit for awhile and the stuck on stuff will be easy to get out.

This dish is good for those times when you don’t really have anything planned, but you have these ingredients on hand.  If I’d had broccoli I could have added that the last 5 minutes of cooking. Any vegetable you like that you know would cook in about 5 minutes would be great!

Do you have a quick “throw-together” meal that you would like to share?

 

Pesto from Basil

I want to be specific that this pesto is made from basil, after discovering that one can make pesto from so many different things. I had a bumper crop of basil in my raised bed this year and decided to use most of it to make pesto. This is a recipe a good friend shared with me five years ago.
I also dried some basil by hanging the stems upside down in the attic (see picture).

PESTO
4 cups coarsely chopped sweet basil leaves
1 cup pine nuts
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1 cup Parmesan cheese
1/4 cup unsalted butter (optional)
2 cloves garlic, crushed
a dash of salt and pepper

Puree all ingredients in a food processor or blender.
Use immediately, freeze or put the pesto in a glass jar and put in the refrigerator. If you put in in the refrigerator, pour a thin layer of olive oil on top of the pesto in the jar and screw the lid on. This will keep for up to 10 days in the refrigerator.
This recipe makes about 1 1/2-2 cups.
basil and noodlesbasil plantsdried basil